How Much Are Fully Fitted Conservatory Prices?

Discover the true costs of fully fitted conservatories. See real conservatory prices.

Fully Fitted Conservatory Prices

Fully fitted conservatory prices can be quite high if you don’t know what you are doing.

How do you solve that?

Simple:

  • Get a conservatory specialist to manage your conservatory installation for you.
  • A specialist knows exactly what is needed. He can help plan out your project very efficiently.
  • You will find that a better planned project results in lower fully fitted conservatory prices.

However:

  • While it is easy to pass on all the responsibility on to a specialist, it is best to know what the fully fitted conservatory prices breakdown is.
  • When you know each step in the process, you know what steps can be optimised for costs without compromising on quality and performance.
  • An informed buyer is a happy buyer!

Fully Fitted Conservatories


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What Are The Fully Fitted Conservatory Prices?

So:

You might be looking for fully fitted conservatory prices for your needs, but can’t find an accurate figure.

The reason for this is:

There is no one answer to that question. The prices change with each tiny little detail.

  • Whether you use uPVC, aluminium, or timber can completely change the quotes you get for fully fitted conservatory prices.
  • What kind of roof you want is a big factor in your fully fitted conservatory prices.
  • Whether your conservatory needs to be single glazed, double glazed, or tripled glazed affects the fully fitted conservatory prices.
  • A large size will obviously cost more than a smaller conservatory.

It completely depends on your needs and specifications!

Your fully fitted conservatory prices will be wholly reliant on the style you want, the colour you select, the size of the conservatory, and how complex you want to base to be.

If you want a simple and small lean-to conservatory, your fully fitted conservatory price could be as low as £3,500. On the other hand, if you want a high-end Gable conservatory, you could find yourself paying upwards of £20,000 to get it fully fitted. As you can see, fully fitted conservatory prices vary greatly, and to find the one for you, you need to know what you want.

What Can You Expect For Your Fully Fitted Conservatory Price?

Here’s the deal:

You cannot expect to set up a conservatory based purely on what you want. Since it is an extension of a building, it needs to be within regulations.

For example, if you live in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, you might need permission to add any feature to your house. Getting the permission might add to the cost of your fully fitted conservatory.

The conservatory cannot be bigger than 50% of the total land surrounding your original property. This calculation also needs to factor in greenhouses and sheds that you may have.

It cannot be higher than the tallest part of your house’s original roof. It must also be separated from the main building by external windows, doors, or some other relevant partition.

Your fully fitted conservatory prices must also include an independent system of heating the conservatory. It needs to have temperature control, and be able to be turned on or off.

In order to make sure that the building regulations are met, the conservatory specialist will first send a designer to assess your property.

The Designer’s Role in Fitting Your Conservatory

It is his job to find out if the conservatory site is level or not, if there are any drainage pipes, or if the desired site lies over obstructions like gas mains.

He will also examine the wall you plan to attach your conservatory to. He will ensure that it does not get in the way of any windows, gas flues, or plumbing vents. His examination will help him recommend to you what design styles work best for your property.

His assessment and time will be added to your fully fitted conservatory prices.

Once you have discussed your conservatory design ideas with the designer, the conservatory specialist will send a technical surveyor.

While you may feel that this addition to the fully fitted conservatory prices is unnecessary, it is not so. Correct planning can help the job go much more smoothly.


Technical surveyor plans your project


The Technical Surveyor’s Role in Fitting Your Conservatory

  • The technical surveyor will create the technical plans for the layout and brickworks plan.
  • He will ensure that the conservatory layout and the components are planned. His plans will help keep the fully fitted conservatory prices clear and organised.
  • The job will now be taken over by the project manager. His skills, and the labour he hires, will also add on to the fully fitted conservatory prices.
  • He will organise a team who will start the building of the base. It’s his job to place the order for the material and organise the transport to the building site.
  • He will ensure that everything runs smoothly, without things getting in the way.
  • If rubbish needs to be removed, he will liaise with the skip for its removal. He will make sure there is an electrician on the job, and a plumber if needed.
  • His job is to make sure that the fully fitted conservatory prices do not go up unexpectedly due to delays.
  • He is also the one who will schedule the delivery of the conservatory frames, glass, and roof once the base work is complete.
  • He will manage your fully fitted conservatory price by bringing in the fitting team and ensuring they do the work quickly and well.

The entire process might take about six days for a simple design, and goes up for a more complicated fully fitted conservatory. Prices of labour and installation go up to reflect this. That’s why the style of the conservatory is so important in calculating the fully fitted conservatory prices.

What Is The Importance Of The Design In Fully Fitted Conservatory Prices?

As we discussed earlier, the more complicated the design, the more it costs to install. However, it is important to understand why the fully fitted conservatory prices are higher for a more elaborate design.

What Are the Different Styles of Conservatory Designs That You Can Choose From?

Lean-To Conservatory

You have the simple Lean-To style which is a basic rectangular shape that can be as big or small as you need. It ‘leans’ against a wall of your house, which is what gives it the name.

The lean-to has a sloped roof that has its highest point against the house wall and gently slopes so the rain water flows off easily.


lean-to conservatories


 

Victorian Conservatory

A Victorian style is a pretty looking style with a three or five faceted bay window on one end. This gives it one side that is curved rather than straight. The slightly complicated style means you pay more in fully fitted conservatory prices for this design.


victorian conservatory


Edwardian Conservatory

The Edwardian conservatory style gives you a great deal of floor space. The highlight of this style is its roof, which can be as high as you want. A lean-to roof has a slight slope, but an Edwardian roof is not dependent on its width, allowing you to create a higher roof than you could with a lean-to.


Edwardian Conservatory


Gable Conservatory

The Gable style conservatory is all about the grand gable roof. This gives your conservatory a dramatic appearance which the others might not be able to.


conservatories uk


All these styles can be adapted into shapes to create versatile living spaces. Some common shapes are L-shaped and P-shaped.

The L-shaped variation can be used to ‘wrap’ the conservatory around your house, against two walls. It can also be used to create an L-shaped extension with only one wall against the house.

These shape variations add to the fully fitted conservatory prices because they obviously require more material. The shapes are created with additional frames and they will obviously have more windows.

How Does the Style Affect The Fully Fitted Conservatory Price?

Now:

You may wonder exactly how the difference in styles affects the fully fitted conservatory prices.

Let’s take the example of a Victorian style conservatory in comparison with a lean-to.

A lean-to is a simple rectangular shape, while the Victorian has a ‘curved’ end. When calculating the fully fitted conservatory prices for these two styles, you can see that the base work for a lean-to would be simpler, thus cheaper.

It’s a simple rectangle while the Victorian base needs to take into account the three or five facets.

It’s not just the base work either. Because the Victorian design is more elaborate, it requires more frames, and more windows than a lean-to of the same size. That is another reason for the difference in the fully fitted conservatory prices for these two styles.

Another factor that would affect the fully fitted conservatory prices is the style of door you want. If you want a patio door or a bi-fold door, they will be more expensive than a single opening door.

The biggest factor, style-wise, in the increase in fully fitted conservatory prices is the roof. They are much more complicated in construction than the sides. They need to be double glazed sealed units with angular cuts. Therefore, the more complicated the roof design, the more drastically it affects the fully fitted conservatory prices.

How Can You Reduce The Fully Fitted Conservatory Prices?

While it may seem easy to reduce your fully fitted conservatory prices by cutting corners, it usually proves to be more problematic in the long run. The smart way to reduce your fully fitted conservatory costs is by understanding what cost is essential and what can be avoided.

For example, you might think that you can save money by not insulating the floor, but you’ll find that this ends up costing you more in the long run.

To start with, you can save a lot of money by getting quotes for fully fitted conservatory prices during the off-peak times of the year. Because the sales are slow at these times, you may get attractive deals and offers.

How to Reduce Fully Fitted Conservatory Prices During Installation

You could do away with the project manager and lower the fully fitted conservatory prices that way. It can be done, but you will need to be prepared for a lot of work.

You can find your own builder and negotiate prices with him. However, you will need to ensure that the footings are the correct depth and the materials are exactly what you want.

Getting a large, well-known installer could add to your fully fitted conservatory prices. You might find a better deal with a smaller local installer. However, you need to ensure they are certified and will do a proper installation.

How to Reduce Fully Fitted Conservatory Prices with Choice of Material

If you’re finding it costly to get the exact brick match, you could go for a cheaper option, such as LBC commons. You can use these to create an attractive and effective design feature.

You can look at options for materials. For example, timber might look great and provide excellent insulation, but is the most expensive material. You can control the fully fitted conservatory prices by opting for uPVC frames instead.


Wooden Conservatory


Cutting Down Fully Fitted Conservatory Prices

These might need replacing every few years, but they are easier to maintain than timber, and are much cheaper.

One way of ensuring low wastages and unnecessary additions to the fully fitted conservatory prices is by telling the surveyor to not order the frames, glass and roof of the conservatory until the base is ready.

This allows him to plan his order according to the ready measurements. This reduces the bloating of fully fitted conservatory prices because of wastage due to inaccurate measurements.

If a detailed plan shows your fully fitted conservatory prices to still be to high, you might want to take a more drastic step and scale down your design plans.

While French doors and bi-folding doors might look more dramatic, they are also more expensive. You can get the same space-saving with sliding patio doors that are cheaper and give the same wide opening for your conservatory.

It might be tempting to have an Edwardian conservatory which you can only just afford by replacing the glass roof with polycarbonate. Don’t give in to the temptation!

This multi-chambered plastic roofing panel does not have the insulating property that glass has. Not only do you end up with higher heating costs, but it can also be very noisy when it rains.

It is better to settle for a less elaborate design that allows you to choose better suited material. This way, you can enjoy your conservatory all year round, irrespective of the weather!

Getting Fully Fitted Conservatory Prices

Also, why not find out your fully fitted conservatory cost with our free online conservatory cost calculator right now!

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Frequently Asked Conservatory Questions

In most instances the council tax will not increase on a property unless the additions another living quarter or self-contained annex. This means the addition of a conservatory should not increase the council tax payable on a property. To be absolutely certain you can always check the government's website which gives advice on council tax.
The main difference between a conservatory and an orangery is how the roof is constructed. A conservatory roof is over 75% glazed whereas an orangery roof has less than this amount. A conservatory also has over half of its wall space glazed whereas an orangery can include more brickwork than this.
Yes, you can put a conservatory on the front of your house. This is because conservatories come under the category of a permitted development. As such in most instances you do not need planning permission. This applies if the area surrounding the original house is not more than 50% covered by other buildings or additions.
A glass conservatory can cost as little as £4,000 depending on the style you choose and the amount of building work you need. Larger glass conservatories with more building work can cost £20,000 and above. If you know the conservatory style and size you need or just want an idea of cost our online conservatory cost calculator will give you a guide price.
A Loggia Conservatory can cost about £15,000 to £20,000 for an average size. The Loggia Conservatory is a popular style but can be more expensive than traditional conservatory styles.
A Loggia Conservatory can cost between 20% to 50% more than a uPVC conservatory. It is a good idea to shop around for quotes in order to get a competitive conservatory cost.
The average conservatory cost begins in the region of £4,000 to £5,000. This will be for a reasonably small and basic conservatory. The cost of a conservatory can be as much as £40,000 to £50,000. This will be a large conservatory, fully fitted with all building work included. As this is a wide spread it is a good idea to know your style and size in order to get an average conservatory cost.
There are many ways of gaining temperature control. Conservatory blinds, ventilating windows, cooling film and air conditioning to name a few. You might also want to consider replacing your conservatory roof with a tiled or solid design.
There are many ways of keeping your conservatory warm in the Winter. If you have a small conservatory then an electric heater will suffice but those with bigger conservatories may want to look into installing underfloor heating.
Glazing is also very important in a conservatory. Most heat can be lost through glass so ensure your conservatory glazing is thermally efficient. You can also tackle draughts or cold spots by installing conservatory blinds.
This will largely depend on your location. You will find that certain areas have different setbacks based on the use of the building. We recommend that you check with your local council or take a look at the Goverment's Planning Portal.

You must notify your neighbour if you want to:

- Build on or at the boundary of your 2 properties - Work on an existing party wall or party structure - Dig below and near to the foundation level of their property
Replacing your conservatory roof can indeed make your conservatory warmer however, this will depend on the type of roof you choose. A solid or tiled conservatory roof will offer greater insulation than a plastic or glazed roof.
A solid roof can be put on a conservatory. There are many solid conservatory roof designs available - just ask your chosen installer for a recommendation. The majority of new-build conservatories with a solid, tiled or glazed roof will not require planning permission. They are covered under what is known as 'permitted development'. However, building regulations will apply if you want to build an extension.
When it comes to your home improvement, it's important to have all the necessary legal documentation. The installation of a conservatory, orangery or porch does not require a FENSA registration form.
The average life span of a uPVC conservatory is largely dependent on the quality of materials and build. Typically, a uPVC frame can last up to 25 years but some can last for decades ensuring they are well maintained.
Planning permissions used to say that a certain percentage of roofing must be translucent in order for a conservatory to be exempt from planning permission. Changes to building regulations however, now means that you may not require planning permission for roof replacement.
Swapping your existing conservarory roof for a tiled or solid roof replacement can be done without needing to file for planning permission. Planning permission may be required however, if the height of your extension is changed following completion.
A conservatory is defined as a 'building that has no less than 75% of its roof area made of translucent material and no less than 50% of its total wall area made of glass.
It is possible to convert a conservatory to an orangery but it isn't a simple process. A surveyor will need to come out and assess your property and conservatory to see if it is at first , feasible.
Both extensions and orangeries often require planning permission and in order to satisfy requirements, a new structure will have to be built.
If a conservatory is within two metres of a boundary, a conservatory should not be higher than three metres. It must also not extend beyond the rear wall of the original house by more than 3m if an attached house or by 4m if a detached house.
For construction work to begin a trench will need to be excavated to a minimum depth of 600mm. A conservatory needs footings just as much as any extension does.
Solid ground will need to found first and needs to be accepted by Building Control as being a minimum of 1 metre in standard conditions.
Foundations will need to be dug and because conservatories are lightweight in structure, their foundation loads are usually quite low. This can often lead to the notion that shallow foundations are satisfactory however, shallow foundations are more susceptible to subsidence.

Conservatories that are built with foundations shallower than the Building Regulations advise, are likely to encounter problems.

Building Regulations state:

A2. The building shall be constructed so that ground movement caused by :-
(a) swelling, shrinkage or freezing of the subsoil; or
(b) land-slip or subsidence (other than subsidence arising from shrinkage), in so far as the risk can be reasonably foreseen, will not impair the stability of any part of the building
Usually, there are no planning requirements when it comes to building a conservatory to a bungalow. However, the conservatory will be subject to certain conditions so be sure to check with your local building authority or with the Government's Planning Portal to ensure your conservatory remains within these guidelines.
Any structure that is built as an extra living quarter will require its own council tax band, even if it shares facilities with the main dwelling. If you're adding a conservatory then council tax won't be an issue however if you're adding a whole new annex, then your council tax is likely to change.
When is a conservatory not a conservatory? In order for a structure to remain a permitted development (a conservatory), the build needs to comply with a number of rules. A conservatory must be ground level, must not be more than 30m2, must be thermally separated from the original building, have its own heating and have glazing in critical zones that meet Part Nof the building regulations.
An extension refers to an additional structure that is anatomically in-keeping with your main property. An extension often requires planning permission unless it is classified as permitted development and is built with opaque cavity walls and brick-based foundations. Extensions are a big home improvement and investment, needing the work of an architect.
Conservatories or glazed extensions are perfect for those looking to add extra space on a budget. Typically, they are less of a logistical strain and in most cases do not require planning permission,
A conservatory can be built under permitted development rights, not needing an application for planning permission. A conservatory however is subject to the limits and conditions listed here. Building a conservatory onto an extension however, will be subject to different conditions. In some cases and under the permitted development regulations, you cannot attach an extension to an already extended part of a dwelling. It has to be attached to the original walls of the dwelling house.
A well built conservatory can increase your home's value by up to 7% . A conservatory can add lots of value to your home, increasing monetary value and making it much more attractive to a prospective buyer. A conservatory extension will change how you live and interact in your home for the better, enhancing space and comfort. It will certainly put your home above other properties too, especially when it comes to attracting a potential buyer. Read more here.
Conservatories are generally much cheaper than a single-storey extension of the same size. The price difference will largely depend on size and how complex the structure is to build, as well as the quality of materials.
The cost of a conservatory extension can range from £6,000 to £20,000. Compared to a full on extension, it is a much more affordable way of increasing space within your property. A full blown extension can cost up to £30,000. An extension is priced on average, per square metre.
A conservatory or single-story extension can be built without planning permission if: It's a maximum of 4 metres high or 3 metres high, within 2 metres of a boundary and the conservatory or extension does not cover more than half of the garden.
From now until 2019, you can extend outwards by up to 8 metres for detached homes and 6 metres for other property types. For this, instead of applying for planning permission you will need to undergo a Neighbour Consultation Scheme.
Fully fitted conservatory prices start from around £4,000 for a small room up to £20,000 + for bigger, more bespoke rooms. To get an idea on how much you can expect to pay for your new conservatory, you can use our conservatory cost calculator. It will provide you with a unique online guide price based purely on your own specifications. Fully fitted conservatory prices will vary from company to company and is also very much dependent on design.
In most circumstances, building regulations tend to apply when you build a new extension or a very large structure to your property. However, most of the time, conservatories are exempt from building regulations when they are erected at ground level and the floor surface areas is less than 30 square metres.
The average life expectancy of a conservatory depends on the quality of materials used as well as the installer. Generally speaking a conservatory built with uPVC window and door frames can last up to 25 - 30 years.
Conservatory extension costs are far more affordable than a full-blown extension. A conservatory costs anything starting from £3,000 - £4,000 deadening on final styles and specifications. On the other hand, full build house extensions can cost anything from £20,000 right up to £100,000+! Generally speaking extensions are priced on average, per square metre.
It is possible to build either a conservatory or a single-storey extension without gaining planning permission if: firstly, it has a maximum height of 4 metres or 3 metres high if situated within 2 metres of an existing boundary. The conservatory itself does not exceed over half the size of the garden.
The average cost to build a conservatory varies depending on many factors such as: size, style, materials, roof, number of windows and doors, building work requirements and internal works e.g. lightning, plastering, finishing etc. On average, costs for smaller type conservatories such as the lean-to conservatory style will start from around £3000 - £4000 including VAT and installation (subject to final requirements and technical survey).
Yes you can! Whatever the shape of your existing conservatory, you can be sure that there is a solid roof equivalent to meet your exacting requirements.
Changing roofs from a polycarbonate to a solid roof means that building regulations will apply. Your chosen installer will be able to answer any questions you have and help with any red tape such as contacting local authorities to resolve building regulations compliance.
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